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The Forum > Article Comments > Bland, politically correct values > Comments

Bland, politically correct values : Comments

By Peter Sellick, published 12/9/2006

Values education is a poor thing, a weak attempt at social engineering aimed at making us better.

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I agree mate, I think the basic Christian stories should be taught to Gen Y. We don't have to believe them but we should at least know what they are.

I don't know if this is necessarily the state's fault though. To be honest, whereas 2 generations ago, most kids would go to Sunday School, now we derive much of our moral compass from TV. The responsibility is left to the church to provide RE in schools (not to indoctrinate but inform), to hold meaningful events that engage with youth culture in the churches, and above all else, to live the life of Christian discipleship, free of the yucky hold of religion, that is so attractive to young people (i.e. people were attracted to Jesus because of who He is, let them be attracted to Christians because of who Jesus is inside them, not because of religosity).

I'm not sure exactly what you're arguing, but that the government is stepping against churches providing RE and trying to teach kids morals without teaching them why. I agree with you, its not the state's job to do this. But I think the church is to blame for not teaching kids (including outside of schools) as much as is society for becoming more hedonistic and the state for becoming more intrusive.
Posted by YngNLuvnIt, Tuesday, 12 September 2006 8:40:15 AM
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From what I have observed of the young, once they reach level 9 of their secondary education, trying to teach them anything is in vain. Although I am not a believer (just subjected to the Judeo-Christian ethic until I was old enough to decide for myself)I think I agree with Peter Sellick.

Sadly though, I don't think it will make much difference what we try to teach, or on what that teaching is based. Several generations now have had it 'too easy'. It's a nice way to live, but there are fewer and fewer people left who actually fought and worked hard to get us the good living conditions; and more and more people who don't remember and don't care. The 'hard knocks' segment of real education is not long there.
Posted by Leigh, Tuesday, 12 September 2006 9:10:04 AM
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Light bulb...

Leigh, if we have it too easy, perhaps we should be exposed to what not having it easy looks like.

A lot of students go on exchanges or have gap years. Lets increase the number of exchanges to poorer countries. Let's make it financially easier for students to go on humanitarian trips in their holidays. It should be a part of growing up. The more we see how others have it, the more we learn about human beings outside of our own back yard AND the more we appreciate how easy our own country has it.

Money being pumped into this would be one governmental and/or religious venture I wouldn't be opposed to.
Posted by YngNLuvnIt, Tuesday, 12 September 2006 9:15:12 AM
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I think that until the system acknowledges that it is not what you teach students but how you treat them that has the most significant impact and makes the most difference then nothing will change.

HOw about a values statement for the Department of Education? Take a look at how they have valued my children and family and how they have dealt with serious allegations of systemic bullying, victimisation and misconduct made about them http://jolandachallita.typepad.com/education/

Children learn by example. Telling them do as I say but not as I do isn't going to work.

The system has to start valuing and protecting our children as individuals first. Our children will then learn by the example.
Posted by Jolanda, Tuesday, 12 September 2006 2:15:00 PM
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I read your blog jolanda but was very vague. what exactly happened to your children, namecalling? exclusion? That s the nature of the playground I am afraid. Kids will be kids afterall.
Posted by hells angel, Tuesday, 12 September 2006 2:47:30 PM
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hells angel I appreciate it is confusing but whilst there have been problems in the playground for the younger one, the issues that my family have with the Department involve the older three and our allegations are of systemic bias, neglect, victimisation, vilification, bullying and discrimination by the adults in the Department of Education. WE allege a conspiracy to cover the matter up.

What happened was that I made some public complaints back in the Year 2000 about the neglect of the education of gifted children and from that moment the system turned on my family and tried to discredit and defame us. My children, who are identified very highly gifted even by the DET were denied access to Opportunity Class and Selective Schools, some teachers and/or principals took it upon themselves to discredit them and me by marking them down, putting them down and publicly humiliating them.

After a number of things happened to my children and we were advised of test results that were just so low that my children said that it was impossible and that they would have to see the tests to believe them we requested documents under the FOI Act and the amount of evidence of bias, manipulation, changing of scores, presentation of incorrect scores, omissions, deletions, inconstancies and errors is alarming. There is obvious evidence of bias and misconduct.

The DET have since then allowed those responsible to deal with the complaints and applications to do with my family and as a result my children have continued to be targeted. The Selective Schools Unit have presented a tale based on lies to anybody who asked and they have just accepted the lies on face value and this is despite the fact that the evidence clearly shows that the Department is not telling the truth.

They have been manipulating my childrenís test marks and documents and targeting my children in order to ruin their reputation and to deny them opportunities and in order to deny them the education that they are not only identified as needing but that they deserved.

Itís culpable neglect.
Posted by Jolanda, Tuesday, 12 September 2006 3:05:44 PM
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