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The Forum > General Discussion > BUDJ BIM an Indigenous eel trap site added to World Heritage List!

BUDJ BIM an Indigenous eel trap site added to World Heritage List!

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Older than the pyramids, the Acropolis, Stonehenge -
Budj Bim has been added to the World Heritage List.
The Victorian site is the first in Australia to
receive protection solely for its Aboriginal
cultural importance.

The site features the remnants of about 300 round
stone huts challenging the common perception that
all Aboriginal people were nomadic.

There's more to read at:

http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/jul/07/budj-bim-indigenous-eel-trap-site-added-to-world-heritage-list

"Perhaps now we shall be able to look at the evidence presented
to us that Aboriginal people did build houses, did build
dams, did sow, irrigate and till the land, did alter the
course of rivers, and much more. Then it is likely that
we shall admire and love our land all the more."
Bruce Pascoe.

Your thoughts please.
Posted by Foxy, Sunday, 7 July 2019 8:11:27 PM
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The area of mainland Australia is 7,659,861 sq km and 300 huts prove what?
Posted by Is Mise, Sunday, 7 July 2019 11:23:10 PM
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Thanks Foxy, your post will bring out the forums band of 'Deniers', I see the first one has popped in already. Their fear is not stone huts, but recognition of Aboriginal sovereignty.

On the topic itself, Budj Bim is truly remarkable, and its listing as a world heritage site is well deserved. This is by far the oldest existing example of human activity ever uncovered, five or six times older than all those you for-mentioned. Your hope that "Perhaps now we shall be able to look at the evidence presented" maybe a forlorn hope, as fear and the reliance on the concept of terra nullius takes over again.
Posted by Paul1405, Monday, 8 July 2019 6:41:00 AM
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Foxy,

A single does not a summer make.

Not all aboriginal communities were nomadic, but the vast majority were.
Posted by Shadow Minister, Monday, 8 July 2019 6:58:27 AM
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Foxy thanks for an interesting thread
I have been aware for decades about this and interested
My childhood more often than not saw eels as the only fish available and we sure had them on our table often
Worldwide they are seen as much wanted food, not here however
Still fish for them smoking some and just cooking others
Our first people, saw the blind snob like taunt, lived in this harsh country very well, not just eels but many food sources we could not use if left in the out back
WHY would anyone be offended by the understanding, like all post caveman humanity, our first nation farmed?
Posted by Belly, Monday, 8 July 2019 7:00:35 AM
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Such work could have been done by pre-Aborigine people ! Why else would there be no follow-up structures over the generations ?
Posted by individual, Monday, 8 July 2019 7:38:05 AM
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