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The Forum > General Discussion > BUDJ BIM an Indigenous eel trap site added to World Heritage List!

BUDJ BIM an Indigenous eel trap site added to World Heritage List!

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SM,

Well, You've now got the evidence and it's been
recognised globally.
Posted by Foxy, Monday, 8 July 2019 10:51:43 AM
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Foxy,

To quote:

"The site was created about 6,600 years ago by the Gunditjmara people and is considered one of the world’s oldest freshwater aquaculture systems.

The site features the remnants of about 300 round stone huts that are the only remaining permanent houses built by an indigenous community in Australia – challenging the common perception that all Aboriginal people were nomadic."

So over the past 10 millenia there is only one site where there is any evidence of permanent settlement and that was nearly 7000 years ago. Given that the aboriginal population at the point of settlement was estimated to be up to 4 million, if they were not nomadic, where where their permanent settlements?
Posted by Shadow Minister, Monday, 8 July 2019 11:12:54 AM
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SM,

Bruce Pascoe in this book, "Dark Emu,"
tells us that:

"New examples are being discovered all the time.
Archaeologists are currently examining a
complex village site in "Australia's dead heart"
where the people had a complex water-management
system, sophisticated housing, stone quarries,
and seed-grinding and storage arrangements."

"This is a major cultural site where people employed
engineering to manage the environment. It has the
potential together with the examination of the hundreds
of similar sites around the country, to provide a
very different picture of Australia's social,
economic, and cultural history."

All one has to do is have a genuine interest in the
Australian past which will provide a rich vein
of knowledge that will inform.

I strongly recommend your getting hold of the book
"Dark Emu,"by Bruce Pascoe. It's a real eye-opener.
Posted by Foxy, Monday, 8 July 2019 11:33:53 AM
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I'd like to know how they established the age of the site !
Posted by individual, Monday, 8 July 2019 11:59:17 AM
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The fish traps at some of the Torres Strait islands are of immense proportion, they go for miles, literally ! I have wondered if the very heavy stones were taken there by raft ? I have the feeling that these structures pre-date the recent/precent inhabitants' cultures !
If they're thousands of years old then why aren't there any hundreds of years old ones ?
Posted by individual, Monday, 8 July 2019 12:03:44 PM
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I have a question for those not impressed with the evidence
How much remains of whitemans settlements from six thousand years ago
Why deny these traps and the homes around them existed
Do we need to tell ourselves these people had to be nomads, if so why
Posted by Belly, Monday, 8 July 2019 12:08:16 PM
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