The National Forum   Donate   Your Account   On Line Opinion   Forum   Blogs   Polling   About   
The Forum - On Line Opinion's article discussion area



Syndicate
RSS/XML


RSS 2.0

Main Articles General

Sign In      Register

The Forum > General Discussion > Holiday reading

Holiday reading

  1. Pages:
  2. Page 1
  3. 2
  4. All
In recent years, reaching for the last Booker Prize winner has been a disappointing way of choosing holiday reading. Whoís got a good recommendation?

Just to start things going ...

I observed the recent passing of Kurt Vonnegut by re-reading Slaughterhouse 5 http://www.amazon.com/Slaughterhouse-Five-Kurt-Vonnegut/dp/0385333846

It was a lot less sophisticated than I remembered (more easily impressed back then, I guess), but it retains its humour and its sadness. Best of all, itís a joyful testament to our ability to make something positive out of the most appalling events.

By far the best novel I read this year was The Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen http://www.amazon.com/Corrections-Jonathan-Franzen/dp/1841156736 It celebrates human diversity like nothing else Iíve ever read.

For me, one of the most haunting books is Marguerite Yourcenarís The Memoirs of Hadrian http://www.amazon.com/Memoirs-Hadrian-Marguerite-Yourcenar/dp/0374529264 The wisdom in every line makes this a book to read very, very slowly.
Posted by jpw2040, Monday, 17 December 2007 4:59:08 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
you're quite right. I purchased the Man Booker 1st prize for our
book club nextyear, The Gathering, by Ann Enright, and was quite
disappointed, although forcing myself to re-read it, I got a bit
more out of it. I don't think it will be on the best-seller lists
for long. It is 30 years since I have read Zen, and the Art of Motor
Cycle Maintenance. Just finished reading it again and got a lot more
out of it. Perhaps I didn't have the wisdom back then. I can recommend it for a slow read on holidays.

Lesley
Posted by lesley, Tuesday, 18 December 2007 1:27:45 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
I've just finished what I consider a passionate, challenging and profoundly affecting memoir from the internationally renowed author of, 'The Caged Virgin,' Ayaan Hirshi Ali, called, 'Infidel.' It's not for the faint hearted, but it gives an interesting glimpse into one of today's most admired and controversial political figures.

Then there's Rachel Treasure's, 'The Rouseabout.' An honest and heartfelt tale of life on the land... which captures the very essence of being Australian.

Of course, there's the newest Bryce Courtenay, "The Persimmon Tree."
And Colleen McCullough's, "Anthony and Cleopatra ."

For lighter reading there's Sophie Gee's, "The Scandal of the Season."
And Tina Brown's, "The Diana Chronicles." Which to my surprise turned out to be a real page-turner`and very readable.

And last but not least there's Antony Loewenstein's, "My Israel Question." For those of you that want to learn more about Israel and Palestine - written by an Australian scholar.

Happy Reading! And a Merry Festive Season to all. May the New Year be a good one!
Posted by Foxy, Tuesday, 18 December 2007 6:50:38 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
In addition to the above general suggestions , it might also be interesting to hear OLO contributors suggest suitable books specifically for fellow contributors, based on the intended recipients character/past contributions etc (if there are none in print, make up an appropriate title & author).

It'd probably be informative & amusing, & allow us to all end the year on a light-hearted, amicable note - then again ...
Posted by Horus, Tuesday, 18 December 2007 7:26:10 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
Anything by Ben Elton. 'The First Casualty' is more serious than his others and an excellent read.
Posted by Jack the Lad, Wednesday, 19 December 2007 11:52:16 AM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
If you like WWI novels, I'd choose Sebastian Faulkes Birdsong and Charlotte Grey and,of course, Pat Barker's superb Regeneration trilogy over The First Casualty. But that's me.

I'm rereading Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff. Man, what a book. Also reread In Cold Blood recently - equally brilliant.
Posted by botheration, Wednesday, 19 December 2007 1:53:38 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
  1. Pages:
  2. Page 1
  3. 2
  4. All

About Us :: Search :: Discuss :: Feedback :: Legals :: Privacy