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The Forum > Article Comments > The new jobography > Comments

The new jobography : Comments

By Ross Elliott, published 31/1/2020

Do we need a new discipline to bring more focus to the changing nature of work: the types of jobs we'll see more of in the future, where they'll likely be located, and their other characteristics?

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It might be a good idea to spell out what these " types of jobs we'll see more of in the future" will be before introducing another 'discipline' or Mickey Mouse degree that will never earn recipients enough money to pay off, leaving taxpayers with the bill. My guess is that there will be fewer jobs of any kind, for too many people, in the future than there are now. Much better to work out how to reduce the population, I say.
Posted by ttbn, Friday, 31 January 2020 8:17:54 AM
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We definitely need to get more people into productive jobs !
And, those in frivolous, unproductive industry particularly bureaucrats, need salary cuts to get the economy back into a more level plating field !
Posted by individual, Friday, 31 January 2020 8:23:56 AM
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Ah ha. And who will pay these folk who will basically collate information?

Like most of your ideas mate, just adding unnecessary cost to the cost of living.

The electronic highway will enable folk to move out of the high priced stacked, packed and racked city locales!

Rapid rail will do likewise!

The jobs of the future will be mostly two kinds, service-oriented and technical in high tech manufacturing.

Schools and learning will go mostly online assisted by video links.

As will some services and marketing that eliminates the useless price gouging, profit demanding, paper shuffling middleman! Whose entirely unproductive activities literally double the cost of living/doing business!

Many white-collar occupations will be automated and digitised. Legal and medical activities will include more electronic replacement and or assistance. Robots,i.e., robots don't have trembling hands even where the surgical procedures are microscopic and extremely delicate!

And the data sharing will limit the activities of fundraising funds for cancer cures in the face of already tried and tested cures.

And ignored in favour of big pharma's' profit sheet and the needs of the fundraisers for relevance and the plum jobs these activities create.

Hopefully, automation and electronic alternatives will include town planning? So, the developers will need to find other ways, besides the brown paper bags, to circumvent the rules! Say with BS jobography?
Alan B.
Posted by Alan B., Friday, 31 January 2020 9:40:02 AM
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Actually, it's the high salary, non-productive who don't even know what a job is that are always trying to tell the rest of us about jobs for & in the future. There'll be many of them who'll be looking for an income when the time comes when productivity will count way more than it does now !
Posted by individual, Friday, 31 January 2020 11:39:45 AM
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Jobography is too narrow a discipline for many people to specialise in. It's something any competent geoinfomatician should be capable of, so although state and local planning departments will need jobographers, they're unlikely to hire anyone solely as a jobographer.

As for your concerns about public transport, they're largely unfounded. You seem to have missed a few very important points:

The CBD remains the preferred location for high value jobs. But there is an equilibrium: when CBD office space becomes more expensive, suburban locations become more attractive. Conversely when CBD office space is cheaper, suburban offices become less attractive.

More diverse working times typically make it easier for public transport serving the CBD, as the crowds are less concentrated; there isn't the need to do so much at once.

Contrary to the assumptions of those who never use it, public transport doesn't exclusively serve the CBD!

Suburban employment locations tend to be spread out along bus routes. This is partly because there's demand for buses to go to those places, and partly because a lot of business premises, and a lot of bus routes, are on major roads.

Australia has been pretty good at avoiding the one business location form that's very difficult to serve with public transport (low density business parks around freeway exits). And while there are still challenges, they're certainly not new.
Posted by Aidan, Friday, 31 January 2020 4:37:56 PM
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a lot of business premises, and a lot of bus routes, are on major roads.
Aidan,
As are most Sheeple !
Posted by individual, Saturday, 1 February 2020 7:44:15 AM
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