The National Forum   Donate   Your Account   On Line Opinion   Forum   Blogs   Polling   About   
The Forum - On Line Opinion's article discussion area



Syndicate
RSS/XML


RSS 2.0

Main Articles General

Sign In      Register

The Forum > Article Comments > America and the world into a new era - Part I > Comments

America and the world into a new era - Part I : Comments

By Bruce Stokes, published 9/9/2008

US candidates for president canít please world opinion: whoever wins will inherit a country with a profound image problem.

  1. Pages:
  2. Page 1
  3. 2
  4. All
The author is correct in stating that America has a huge image problem. It stems from the arrogance of believing America rules, runs and inded owns the world, and their determination to prove there are no other contenders for the position, and capacity to use any means to ensure it.

When will the other nations start to ignore "the bully in the playground" and get the courage to actively seek their own way rather than trying to clone a country who cant se beyond the bridge of their own nose?
Posted by Sofisu, Tuesday, 9 September 2008 10:33:12 AM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
I have lived many years in the US and I am very familiar with the American attitude of "my way or the high way". The average American really doesn't care what the rest of the world thinks about them.

The average American is very proud of the might and military strength the US has in it's world dominating ways - much like the typical Aussie is very proud of Australian footy and cricket teams.
Posted by Bruce, Tuesday, 9 September 2008 11:35:48 AM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
Not a lot to argue with here. Yep, Americans on the whole lurve their military; nope, they don't give a hoot what the planet thinks of them.

Sport, particularly football, is often viewed as a surrogate for war. The English still talk about their world cup victory in the 60's. Bruce the world would be a better place I think if the US got involved with other countries on an equal footing such as on a sporting field. It just never happens. Americans are no less proud of its sporting achievements than Australians are; it's just that ours aren't overshadowed by hubris in other fields.

A President McCain, if that eventuates, will be the guy who breaks the-rest-of-the-world's heart.
Posted by bennie, Tuesday, 9 September 2008 12:28:14 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
I agree with the point of the article and a good one it is and very timely.

I visit the US regularly and yes they do have their faults, so do we and evreywhere else I've ever been - the US gets big airplay for all the bad they do, since bad news sells, ask your local media folks about that.

The US and its people also do a lot of good in the world, largely unreported, here's one example Bill Gates of Microsoft fame is donating a Billion Dollars, I believe that's right, to fighting malaria in Africa - there's lots of other examples. President Bush has done more for Africa int he way of aid and assistance than anyone has ver done - largely unreported. I just felt I should mention a few good things they have done because even though very insulated at home, Amreicans are just like us, they have likes and dislikes and fears and hopes.

our comunity in Australia has higely benefited from US R&D, computers, engineering medicine, hugely - so tell me who else has contributed so much.

yes, they have an image problem, largely becuase of unbalanced reporting by media who see themselves as unbiased, (they just hate the US and President Bush.)

The world would not be a better place, I believe, if the US went back to being an insular country unengaged with the world. They did that in twice last century, and had to be drawn back out to save our sorry skins in two world wars.
Posted by rpg, Tuesday, 9 September 2008 12:55:33 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
Good article,

It is a huge shame that the vote for such an important figure comes down to such a meaningless debate in the US around personalities and not issues, and the utter ignorance of most of the voting population. The Republicans continually appeal to the worst instincts of the electorate; mindless nationalism, xenophobia and a hatred of elitism (anyone not projecting a folksy, small time vision of 50s america).
Yes we should also recognise the achievements of the US, but I wager that the likes of Washington, Eisenhower, Roosevelt, Wilson and Truman would be horrified by the current state of their country, the poverty of the political debate and general poor standing the US has in the world. From being the world's saviour in 1945 the US now generates the emnity the article describes.

In terms of this election I am very concerned by the ways in which both candidates define themselves by attacking the character of their opponent rather than selling their own policies.

And I simply do not understand how the polls can be even the day after such gloomy economic data is revealed; massive job losses, government bailing out two largest mortgage lenders, car companies like GM and Ford threatening to go to the wall without massive governement assistance. How can the electorate just ignore facts like this and even think about voting for the party in government for the last eight years?

gw
Posted by gw, Tuesday, 9 September 2008 1:32:16 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
Dear gw

You write "In terms of this election I am very concerned by the ways in which both candidates define themselves by attacking the character of their opponent rather than selling their own policies."

Actually Obama is doing his best not to attack the character of his opponent and is on the record as stating that he wants to get away from this style of politics.

Unfortunately, however, your next statement puts it all in context: "I simply do not understand how the polls can be even".

That's because character assassination works extremely effectively and the Republicans have no such compunction in using this type of campaigning: witness Sarah Palin's attack dog speech at the party rally (interestingly followed by McCain stating a desire for the end of partisan politics).

I suspect McCain himself would prefer to avoid this type of negative campaigning, but he is up against it and probably has little choice but to accept all the dirty tricks the Republicans have perfected over the last 30 years.
Posted by Cazza, Tuesday, 9 September 2008 2:09:46 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
  1. Pages:
  2. Page 1
  3. 2
  4. All

About Us :: Search :: Discuss :: Feedback :: Legals :: Privacy