The National Forum   Donate   Your Account   On Line Opinion   Forum   Blogs   Polling   About   
The Forum - On Line Opinion's article discussion area



Syndicate
RSS/XML


RSS 2.0

Main Articles General

Sign In      Register

The Forum > Article Comments > What is it with Corby supporters? > Comments

What is it with Corby supporters? : Comments

By Surya Deva, published 27/5/2005

Surya Deva argues the rule of law must be respected regardless of the jurisdiciton and no matter how unpalatable

  1. Pages:
  2. Page 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. ...
  7. 13
  8. 14
  9. 15
  10. All
I was brought to this article from news.google.com.au after browsing for an update on the Corby verdict.

I don't want to comment on the case directly; rather, I'd like to thank the author for reminding me that issues like this - that is, those that provoke a strong emotional response in those unrelated to the case, such as myself - sometimes make one forget that it is important to stand back, to judge every issue on its own merits, and to not form opinions based on a subset of information (in my case, the information provided to me by the mainstream Australian media).

I have been guilty in this case of forming judgements based on limited facts. Thank you for making me think; and for bringing me to this website, which I'm sure will rapidly become a favourite.

j.
Posted by John Noble, Friday, 27 May 2005 12:29:55 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
It is so sad that Indonesia the country of CORRUPTION can decide on someone's life.
Posted by frenchdude, Friday, 27 May 2005 2:08:39 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
About time we were exposed to a level headed approach to this issue.
I can't help but think that many of the emotional responses were guided by latent prejudices against Indonesia (for whatever reason) and not informed by the facts, rule in law and above all the inter- national jurisdiction and the contemporary cultural polity that exists between Austrlia and Indonesia.

In another forum article http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=3418 Surya Deva rightly points out "that it is hypocritical for the US and Australia to decry the [human rights] abuses of other countries when their [our] own corporations violate these same human rights in the backyards of developing countries".[such as Indonesia]

The point Iím attempting to make here is that we need a fuller picture of our diplomatic and national profile in countries such as Indonesia to understand how this may or may not influence criminal proceedings.

Was the lack of movement by our federal government on corporate human rights abuses in Indonesia have an influence the way in which Corbey was treated by Indonesiaís criminal justice system? I say no, these are their domestic laws.

We expect Indonesians to abide by our laws when they visit, Indonesia expect the same courtesy from us when we visit their country.

Would the abuses by our corporations have an influence on the political and diplomatic ability of our government intervene and negotiate to embedd our own notions of legal fairness on behalf of Corby?

Most definitely Yes.
Posted by Rainier, Friday, 27 May 2005 2:29:36 PM
Find out more about this user Visit this user's webpage Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
Rainier - any corporations operating in Indonesia either comply with or break Indonesian law. No matter how much people yell and squeal about "evil" corporations committing all sorts of injustices upon the peasants of foreign countries, those corporations operate within the law of those lands.

If you've got a problem, take it up with the Indonesian government. By the way, which Australian corporations are committing human rights abuses in Indonesia? What should our government do about it?
Posted by bozzie, Friday, 27 May 2005 3:13:40 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
The primitive system of justice practised in Indonesia: that a person is guilty until he / she proves their innocence. Such a case is more difficult for the accused to present before Indonesian Judges. The prosecution did not have to present any forensic evidence to prove her guilt, just had to maintain the drugs were in her posession. It is more difficult for an innocent person to clear their name of guilt if all the evidence is not properly maintained.

The Australian Westminster system of justice where the prosecution must produce the evidence to prove guilt of the offender is a far superior and more just system. That Chapelle is guilty was not determined by the evidence presented by the prosecution, as the judges already had a predisposition with their offhanded comments on the fact of the illegal substance was in bags she owned and proved her guilt.

Similar primitive justice is being introduced into Australian law with the introduction of tribunals where the person must prove they had not committed an offense. Australia is being influenced by recommendations from the multicultural foundation to introduce similar legal proceedings.
Posted by Philo, Friday, 27 May 2005 7:27:23 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
Australia too has plenty of corruption (Frenchdude & Philo). When foreign visitors come to our shores they are subject to our laws. Our peculiar laws and particular brand of institutional racism (just think about our Prime Minister for a moment) must shock and puzzle many a visitor. Much as Corby's attractive face and emotional appeals have aroused great sympathy amongst most Aussies, laws and courts the world over are there for a purpose. Many australians are wrongfully convicted. The outcries are few. Yet as soon as the nation doing the convicting, according to their laws, is a nation of people of different skin colour and religion the Australian public goes balistic. Let us save our indignation for a matter we can do something about - the many people being wrongfully incarcerated in THIS country.
Posted by Ironer, Friday, 27 May 2005 9:10:34 PM
Find out more about this user Recommend this comment for deletion Return to top of page Return to Forum Main Page Copy comment URL to clipboard
  1. Pages:
  2. Page 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. ...
  7. 13
  8. 14
  9. 15
  10. All

About Us :: Search :: Discuss :: Feedback :: Legals :: Privacy