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The Forum > Article Comments > Why has the state government ignored key recommendation from own DV taskforce? > Comments

Why has the state government ignored key recommendation from own DV taskforce? : Comments

By Cassandra Pullos, published 17/2/2017

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk's reported remarks urging parties demanding new measures for DV offenders to first discuss the issue, seems to ignore her Government's own DV taskforce recommendations of 2015.

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It seems to me, if there is a "global" epidemic of domestic violence, there is simply a global epidemic od drugs and alcohol abuse. Bet I'm closer the mark than this "expert"!
Posted by diver dan, Friday, 17 February 2017 1:29:47 PM
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"We need to identify the triggers and how to stop acts of violence before they occur."

Or conversely stop domestic relationships before they occur which will stop domestic violence. Domestic relationships are not compulsory but it seems women are willing to, indeed they seem desperate to, enter into relationships where there is an 'epidemic' of violence. Why is no one focusing on such reckless behaviour?
Posted by phanto, Friday, 17 February 2017 1:51:46 PM
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On the face of it the idea of GPS tracking of proven high risk offenders in a whole range of categories of criminal behaviour would seem to make a lot of sense. DV in some circumstances maybe more so because it's more likely to be targeted.

On the other hand having spent a lot of years looking at the scam that is much of public policy around DV and the research that's favoured in the media I have serious doubts that GPS tracking would be applied entirely on the basis of behaviour, I suspect gender would be a bigger factor.

I suspect pushing for GPS tracking of a clients ex would become another tool in the arsenal of family law lawyers trying to up the anti and push said clients ex to a more desperate position possibly leading to the kind of breakdown or snap that gives the client an edge in the battle that the family law system is so determined to promote in relationship breakdowns.

GPS tracking as described is probably a good idea but having seen how poorly the topic of DV is handled by most so called DV support groups and government I doubt very much that it would be implemented in a way that actually reduced risk to life and limb.

My own sense is that the most controllable part of DV fatalities is the way the family law system promotes adversarial behaviour, the way it provides incentives for people up the anti in a separation or divorce, the way it's so ruthlessly exploited by many in the legal profession to maximise their own profits with no regard to any sense of fair play or the impacts on the parties involved of the escalated conflict all to often resulting.

R0bert
Posted by R0bert, Friday, 17 February 2017 9:35:18 PM
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I took a look at 'Not Now, Not Ever: Putting an end to domestic and family violence in Queensland', but I couldn't find the list of recommendations.

Personally, I think the investigations into understanding Domestic Violence are flawed, because they single-mindedly focus on the specific act of DV itself which makes almost any investigation an attack on men.

One might think I'm attempting to defend the perpetrators of DV, but this is not the case at all.
What I'm interested in is not looking at the DV itself, but how it gets to that point.

Two people are attracted to each other, enjoy each others company and start a relationship.
If women want to portray men as this: "Our relationship was going great, then suddenly without warning or any reason he woke up one day and just started punching me in the face", then I don't totally buy it.

It's not about the act of Domestic Violence itself, it's about the 'dance'; the things that lead to that physical altercation.

My personal opinion is that once police intervene and a person has been charged with DV, then the relationship is doomed (if it wasn't already long beforehand), only the participants may not completely aware, many cases both are still co-dependent.

You can't just blame the man, it's too easy.
Two people took the relationship to that point.

They say 'The women was disempowered and couldn't leave'.
But why would a man stay in that very same relationship if he knew he was looking at police involvement, arrest, court, potential removal from his home and potential jail time?
Is it not reasonable that he also felt trapped and disempowered and that he couldn't leave?

I think the real issue of DV is more of a two-way street involving 'emotional blackmail and manipulation' that causes men to feel trapped; and when a person's pushed into a corner eventually they'll lash out.

It's the two-way street that interests me, not this 'lets blame all men' one-way street.
Though I don't discredit the idea that some men are simply thugs with their women too.
Posted by Armchair Critic, Saturday, 18 February 2017 6:51:06 AM
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[cont.]

There's too many women on that panel, the only man was a cop.
I don't think a mainly all women panel should be getting together to figure out ways to punish men, though I'm not necessarily opposed to the ankle bracelets, I accept the relationship is toxic at this point and that both parties are doing each other harm and are both likely to be far better off separated.
Quite often though, couples that have seen police involvement will continue their relationship.

"We need to identify the triggers and how to stop acts of violence before they occur."

That's not likely to happen, because women want to blame men for everything rather than equally take a look at their own behavior in the events that lead up to DV.

Women discard many men immediately upon meeting them and they put them into the 'friend zone'.
But then they choose men who would mistreat and harm them.
It's women's 'filter' in choosing the wrong men which is just as much to blame, and what leads them into the situations they find themselves in.
If in their minds they 'are' choosing the right guy, and would still go back to them despite the DV, well they have themselves to blame don't they?
Posted by Armchair Critic, Saturday, 18 February 2017 7:29:51 AM
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Armchair Critic,

You have a point there where you talk about women preferring 'bad boys'.

Although later in life when they want a home and security, the same women make a bee-line for the men who have applied themselves to study, work, providing for the future and who are good citizens. It is up to these good men to reject such women out of hand. They are always poor choices for good men, as the 'bad boys' were to the foolish skanks who preferred them.

Isn't it a pity that few mothers educate their boys on what girls and women to prefer and why and how to identify the losers? Although those acquired tatts do help with that.

Some things are difficult to believe. Such as the women and media who wrongly buff up and ooze over 'bad boys', unethically presenting them to girls and young women as models of exciting prospects of manliness.

Here is a topical example and there is NO obvious redefinition or cries of horror from other women, nor from the feminists and DV industry for that matter,

Jeremy Meeks, allegedly a violent, sociopathic, career criminal AND totally 'hot' and 'desirable' to women, a model and an icon

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3488401/Criminally-handsome-felon-Jeremy-Meeks-deluged-modeling-offers-freed-t-half-way-house-weeks-come.html
and
http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/Jeremy-Meeks-criminal-history-687543

I have not posted any links to the flattering puff pieces from Australian media sources. Like the huge majority of good men who would never be involved in violence or harm to anyone, quite the reverse, I am NOT going to give local media mentions of this lout any further publicity.
Posted by leoj, Saturday, 18 February 2017 11:32:14 AM
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