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The Forum > Article Comments > Where to now for Europe and the EU? > Comments

Where to now for Europe and the EU? : Comments

By Mal Fletcher, published 28/6/2016

Studies show that in normally Europhile nations like Denmark, France and to a slightly lesser degree Germany and Sweden, unusually high proportions of populations are dissatisfied.

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Where now? Far better border control and and the return of visas for all!

That said there are boundless opportunities here for Australia? With the right kind of economic migrants persuaded to along with their sizable bank balances, super entitlements and gold standard health insurance to migrate here to avoid the promised wealth tax most of Europe seems to be considering?

We could massively encourage that along with high tech manufacture to relocate here, with very doable, very low cost energy and a completely revamped tax system finally made free of all parasitic and all other onerously costly, completely unproductive practice! [Well somebody has to bleed us!?]

These very doable two are how we set australia up for a far better future and bulwarked against the economic (tsunamis) shock waves that have no other choice than come, given the massive (pass the parcel) debt levels washing around through much of the northern hemisphere!

And given that fact, we really do need to guard against an intended influx of debt laden speculators, who add nothing but their price gouged profit demands, as they seek along with a myriad of other impossible dreams to trade out of trouble?

Always providing they can find some gullible mugs like still well resourced and economically sound target economies to pick up the can and carry it for them?

Roll up roll up. A hole in the head anyone? You know you need one like there's no tomorrow? And think, Australia has always needed foreign funds! Sign on the dotted line,thanks. There's one born every five minutes!
Alan B.
Posted by Alan B., Tuesday, 28 June 2016 9:54:17 AM
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If the benefits of trade and other agreements between Britain and Europe were as manifest as the Remain campaigners claimed then there would have been no need for a referendum. The lesson from all this is that for a state to legitimately surrender its sovereignty, it should have a very clear mandate from a large majority of its citizens. If the UK ever had that mandate, it has now been withdrawn.
Posted by Jon J, Tuesday, 28 June 2016 10:17:04 AM
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only genrations of dumbed down people could want an unelected body of socialist to tell them how to run their countries. Any suggestions for the empty offices in Brussels left by overpaid bureacrats?
Posted by runner, Tuesday, 28 June 2016 10:25:56 AM
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Todayís European Union bears little resemblance to the post-war European unification project pursued by statesmen like Jean Monnet and Robert Schuman of France and Alcide de Gasperi of Italy. They didnít want a European Union, but a European Community, in which European nations would work together as partners to achieve peace and prosperity, rather than be subordinated to a small clique of bureaucrats.

Since the Maastricht Treaty (1993) and the Lisbon Treaty (2009), the European Union has become a supranational super state in which the interests of a small group of bureaucrats trump those of the people.

If the European Union wants to survive, it must return to its founding principles. The model of cooperation rather than domination worked in Western Europe during the early post-war era.
But the current situation, in which two-thirds of EU member statesí legislation is made in Brussels, only alienates Europeans and will provoke even more Euroskepticism.
Posted by Raycom, Tuesday, 28 June 2016 10:42:22 AM
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"It is too early to tell exactly what difference the Brexit decision in the UK might have on these wider pubic views within the EU."

"Pubic views within the EU": Freudian slip?
Posted by Raycom, Tuesday, 28 June 2016 3:26:22 PM
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European unification after WWII was a great idea so long as those who were trying to implement it respected Europeís Christian roots as a unifying factor (see e.g. J. Chaplin, G. Wilton, God and the EU: Retrieving the Christian Inspirations of the European Project , Routledge Dec. 2015), notwithstanding the frequent violations of these values in European history that culminated in Holocaust and other atrocities of WWII.

This great idea is now struggling to survive only a few decades after Christianity - as a unifying historical, cultural and moral factor going beyond mere religion - was abandoned and replaced by what in German is officially called Wertegemeinschaft, i.e. Community of values (that keep on being added to), where the religious vacuum is being gradually filled by Islam.

This is certainly not the main cause of the decline of EU but is it just a coincidence?
Posted by George, Wednesday, 29 June 2016 8:36:08 AM
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