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The Forum > Article Comments > Professional communicators control elections > Comments

Professional communicators control elections : Comments

By Richard Stanton, published 2/8/2010

There is a serious disconnection thatís developed between politicians, political candidates, and their citizen stakeholders.

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This is a timely article.

As an example of just how professional communicators control elections, look to Gillard's announcement this morning that she is now going to dump the strategists and just be herself.

The silliest thing of all about her boast is that she thinks we'll believe that the strategists haven't advised her to say she's dumped them and just be herself, in an effort to win back lost ground.

A PM chucking out the professionals half way through a campaign? Let alone a PM like Gillard who is so consummately a product of the Labor party machine.
Posted by briar rose, Monday, 2 August 2010 12:42:33 PM
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Professional communicators have largely been needed due to the total impartial media. One only needs to watch Q&A to see the total imbalance given to the conservative point of view. This is consistent with ABC practice. No doubt over the next couple of weeks our national broadcasters will be doing everything possible to ensure a Labour victory while trying to create the impression of impartiality.
Posted by runner, Monday, 2 August 2010 3:29:43 PM
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I think that this is perfectly true but the reason may lie in the new 'fact' that politicians no longer seem to be able to communicate with their electorate other than through the reports that the media choose to make. It is often not what the politician actually said, rather than what the media reported she/he meant to say. An example is this matter of the people's assembly: I have seen nowhere any modus operandi for this assembly but this has not daunted the media who have consigned the idea, very effectively, to the 'silly bin'. It may not be so silly for reasons given in this article.
Posted by Gorufus, Monday, 2 August 2010 7:56:06 PM
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In trying to impress people on good government, there are many things to consider, and integrity, intelligence, greed and fanatical obsessions are probably the most important characteristics to be considered. I do not believe that many of the decisions made or being considered by the ccommunicators of the constituents in the existing election - or earlier ones, take into consideration these characteristics, as the retaining of that relative low top tax has, over the last 40 years, allowed those greedy people with the ability to take excessively high salaries or other incomes, at will. This has caused higher than reasonable costs of goods and services, and also loss of jobs, incomes and family homes, without even mentioning the economy, this has gone down like a bust balloon. The present polls taken recently, more properly indicates the intelligence and integrity ratio of the members of the parties involved, 30%. Don't blame me for that assessment, that's of their own doing. It is hard to say just what considerations the communicators take to understand just what the voting people will put up with, it's a bit hard to put up with isn't it.
Posted by merv09, Tuesday, 3 August 2010 8:11:31 AM
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