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The Forum > Article Comments > Plastic is for burning! > Comments

Plastic is for burning! : Comments

By Ken Calvert, published 5/2/2019

Wastes to energy incineration is the choice of an increasing number of our world's cities, especially where land is in short supply. Our world needs plastic.

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Indy, I have to get in on your question, and the answer is;NOWHERE!
Well to be precise, nowhere in Australia.
The numbers make it a no-go crop.
Australia simply does not have the water to throw away on thirsty crops.
Now maybe you might get a look-in at the Ord up North, but the greedy scumbag politicians and their filthy lobbyists and thieving mates, just went ahead, closed off the Murray for their own selfish end and killing the people and everything else it was supporting.
We need a vigilante group to begin rectifying these criminal acts instigated by these bastards.
I am the kind of guy that believes in 'the end justifies the means'.
Unfortunately, these people do not respond to talking so by doing so they are authorising physical actions to convince them to reverse such bad decisions, even if it costs them their lives.
We used to have the death penalty for acts of serious crimes especially those where people died.
It is only appropriate that it be re-instated, even if by the public.
You will begin to see a shift in govt thinking very quickly, when they realise their scum-baggery will end up costing them their lives.
Posted by ALTRAV, Saturday, 9 February 2019 8:09:25 PM
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Researchers Developed a Technique to Turn Nearly a Quarter of Our Plastic Waste into Fuel
The process could help convert millions of tons of plastic we generate every year into an gasoline and diesel-like fuel.

http://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/xwbw3k/researchers-developed-a-technique-to-turn-nearly-a-quarter-of-our-plastic-waste-into-fuel

A team of chemists at Purdue may have found a partial solution to our plastic woes. As detailed in a paper published this week in Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, the chemists discovered a way to convert polypropylene—a type of plastic commonly used in toys, medical devices, and product packaging like potato chip bags—into gasoline and diesel-like fuel. The researchers said that this fuel is pure enough to be used as blendstock, a main component of fuel used in motorized vehicles.

Polypropylene waste accounts for just under a quarter of the estimated 5 billion tons of plastic that have amassed in the world’s landfills in the last 50 years.

To turn polypropylene into fuel, the researchers used supercritical water, a phase of water that demonstrates characteristics of both a liquid and a gas depending on the pressure and temperature conditions. Purdue chemist Linda Wang and her colleagues heated water to between 716 and 932 degrees Fahrenheit at pressures approximately 2300 times greater than the atmospheric pressure at sea level.

When purified polypropylene waste was added to the supercritical water, it was converted into oil within in a few hours, depending on the temperature. At around 850 degrees Fahrenheit, the conversion time was lowered to under an hour.

The byproducts of this process include gasoline and diesel-like oils. According to the researchers, their conversion process could be used to convert roughly 90 percent of the world’s polypropylene waste each year into fuel.

“Plastic waste disposal, whether recycled or thrown away, does not mean the end of the story,” Wang said. “Plastics degrade slowly and release toxic microplastics and chemicals into the land and the water. This is a catastrophe because once these pollutants are in the oceans, they are impossible to retrieve completely.”
Posted by Philip S, Sunday, 10 February 2019 12:31:27 PM
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Philip, a couple of things I am curious about.
Firstly, from what little I know on the topic of recycling, I am left with the all too familiar feeling that the cost of recycling this plastic will cost more than the value of the resulting oil/fuel.
The other point is that she makes a very serious claim about the contamination of the oceans by the micro-chemicals released from these plastics.
I am confused because plastics in their final state emit nothing toxic that I am aware of.
Now if these toxins are released when crushed and turned to powder, it may be a different story, but even then it would all happen in a controlled environment, so I cannot see any contamination of oceans (or anything for that matter) occurring.
Posted by ALTRAV, Sunday, 10 February 2019 3:30:43 PM
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ALTRAV Can't answer the question, I found the article and thought others with more knowledge on the subject may be able to make use of the information.
Posted by Philip S, Sunday, 10 February 2019 5:15:53 PM
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Philip, OK thanks.
Posted by ALTRAV, Sunday, 10 February 2019 5:41:07 PM
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