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The Forum > Article Comments > Agreed rules, COP24 and climate change protest > Comments

Agreed rules, COP24 and climate change protest : Comments

By Binoy Kampmark, published 3/1/2019

Little progress was actually made on the issue of commitments to cut emissions, even if there was, in principle, an agreement on a set of rules.

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those who keep waffling on about doing "something" to combat Climate change are in fact those who don't do anything about it themselves.
Ether very stupid or highly hypocritical. my guess is both !
Posted by individual, Thursday, 10 January 2019 5:44:26 PM
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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6579515/Scientists-warn-Earths-magnetic-North-Pole-begun-moving-erratically-speeds-50km-year.html?ito=social-facebook

Have a look at this.
Posted by individual, Saturday, 12 January 2019 7:40:06 PM
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I saw an article that said the poles are getting ready to flip.
Don't hold your breath though, might take a couple of hundred years.
And take a 100 years to do it.
Posted by Bazz, Saturday, 12 January 2019 9:49:04 PM
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ALTRAV,
The ice sheets are very thick. If they all melted, it really would be enough to cause a 60 or 70m sea level rise. So if that's the source of your disbelief then you're on shaky ground and iI suggest you learn more about how much ice is out there.

However, if the source of your disbelief is that you don't think it could all melt, you MAY be right. Antarctica is very cold; cold enough, it would seem, to keep the ice solid. But there are complications we now know there are rivers below the East Antarctica Ice Sheet. AIUI they exist partly because ice has a lower melting point at high pressure, and partly because of heating from the rocks below. And ice with water below it is far more mobile than ice on dry rock. At the moment we still don't know to what extent climate change could threaten the EAIS; it could well be negligible but it may not be. However what oceanographers have known since the early 1990s is that if deglaciation occurs, it will be a very slow process, taking centuries.

Although you won't have to worry about 60m sea level rises, your gut feeling is also wrong - unless there's tremendous action on greenhouse gases, sea level rise will NOT be negligible. There's already a lot of extra heat going into the oceans, which is causing the water in them to expand, and even a 1m sea level rise will have huge consequences. And there's also the two smaller ice sheets to consider - Greenland's already slushy in summer, and West Antarctica's ice is moving faster now that the ice shelves (floating on the sea) which held it back are gone. The main threat is not the big sea level rise from complete collapse, but the continuous rise from the ice sheets losing more H2O than they gain.

We'd all like to think that climate change will not be a catastrophe. But it really depends on action, not wishful thinking.
Posted by Aidan, Sunday, 13 January 2019 1:07:38 AM
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Aidan, I am reminded of a feature done some years ago.
It was part of something else, but what they demonstrated basically, was that one cubic metre of snow produced a fraction of water, certainly no-where near a cubic metres worth.
On a much smaller scale the ice was shown to expand as it freezes and contract when melted.
Not suggesting it would all make that much difference, but neither can I accept notions of 60-70 metre rises in ocean levels.
Posted by ALTRAV, Sunday, 13 January 2019 3:50:31 AM
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ALTRAV,
Snow is indeed low density, as it has lots of air in it. But apply pressure and it gets compacted; the air gets squeezed out. Compact it enough and you're left with ice - a few little air bubbles remain, but overall a cubic metre contains about 900kg of H2O (whereas a cubic metre of fresh water would be about 1000kg).

Predictions of 60m sea level rises in our lifetimes are wrong, and we've known them to be wrong for over a quarter of a century. But it's NOT because there isn't enough H2O on this planet. There is, no matter how much trouble you have comprehending it.
Posted by Aidan, Sunday, 13 January 2019 11:14:57 AM
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