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The Forum > Article Comments > Kim Jong-Unís survival strategy > Comments

Kim Jong-Unís survival strategy : Comments

By Felix Imonti, published 21/5/2018

North and South Korea had to convince Donald Trump that a small achievement is a grand victory.

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Loudmouth,
I am not sure what you wanted to mean by "meetings between Japan and China." Edwin O. Reischauer, a Harvard professor, was appointed US ambassador to Japan by President Kennedy.
"...the Chinese have never reciprocated the warm feelings of the Japanese, viewing them with distrust and more than a liitle contempt. The Japanese nostalgia for China has been a classic case of unrequited love," wrote Reischauer in 1978. He had in mind the mutual relationship not only in the postwar years but throughout the whole history.
He went on to say, "...the Japanese feeling of cultural closeness to China is not based on reality, (Reischauer, The Japanese.)" There are three Confucianist countries in the world, China, Korea and Vietnam. Japan was not and is not a Confucianist country. Korean culture is more Confucian that Chinese culture is itself.
To be continued.
Posted by Michi, Thursday, 24 May 2018 12:27:54 PM
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Loudmouth,
I (Yoshimichi Moriyama) sent eight comments on Project-Syndicate/Ian Buruma/Political Machismo, April 10. I quoted some lines from Ben-Ami Shillony's Politics and Culture in Wartime Japan. I would like you to read them. You could not have found such a country as Japan, in either prewar or postwar years, where pro-American and pro-English feelings had permeated society. People of the West often think, mistakenly, for instance that democracy was introduced into postwar Japan. Democracy had been developing in prewar Japan at least since 1899 when the Japanese modern constitution was promulgated. Despite the war efforts of the government, not monolithic, to mobilise the nation, "a totalitarian dictatorship did not evolve there," "...on closer analysis, it is difficult to sustain the contension that Japan was a military dictatorship or that she was led by lunatics," "Despite the barrage of (official) anti-American rhetoric (as part of national war mobilisation), it was not easy to persuade the puplic to hate the Americans," "The attempt to transfer the traditional admiration for Britain and the US to Nazi Germany did not succeed," and "these pro-Western feelings, which could not be erased, were soon to come to surface from the ashes of defeat (Shillony)."

http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/political-machismo-trump-mussolini-by-ian-buruma-2018-4.
Posted by Michi, Thursday, 24 May 2018 1:15:44 PM
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Hi Michi,

When I wrote, "I suspect that, instead of a meeting between Trump and Kim, there will be (if they haven't happened already) meetings between North and South Korea, China and Japan, with maybe (or maybe not) Russia and Vietnam playing subsidiary roles...." Im sorry if you thought I meant meetings only between Japan and China. I apologise for any confusion.

As for some Chinese distrust of the Japanese, probably Nanking has something to do with that. And, in total, the loss of fifty million, mostly civilians, is quite a legacy to be distrustful about. For all that, I think they will still co-operate over North Korea no matter what Trump thinks.

Lots of surprises yet :)

Joe
Posted by Loudmouth, Thursday, 24 May 2018 1:46:11 PM
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Michi

I'd agree with Loudmouth's comments particularly with the atrocities committed by the Japanese armed forces in China and other Asian nations. The Japanese were the Nazis of the Asia-Pacific, although they seemed to have amnesia about their appalling wartime record, their neighbours haven't forgotten.

The statement that Japan was 'tricked' into WW2 is ridiculous. Japan successfully attacked China and Russia early in the 20 century, both ramshackle regimes. The country's catastrophic and remarkably stupid mistake was the assumption that the US would also be easily defeated
Posted by mac, Thursday, 24 May 2018 3:40:54 PM
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Loudmouth and Mac,

Perhaps you meant five million Chinese people were killed in the Sino-Japanese war. The Chiang Kaishek's Natinalists said three million at the end of the war. When the Communists arrived in Beijing, they said ten million; and Deng Xiaoping upped it to fifteen million, but I do not remeber when because the Chinese do things like this so often, which is an normal affair. Jiang Zemin said thirty-five million in Moscow in 1994. It seems that the war was still going on in 1994 between Japan and China. A Chinese professor was asked by a Japanese woman expert on what evidence they claimed thirty-five. He replied a number smaller than that did not emotionally satisfy them.
To be continued.
Posted by Michi, Friday, 25 May 2018 11:42:08 AM
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Loudmouth and Mac,

About the Nanjing atrocities. The Japanese army attacked the Chinese in December, 1937. When they arrived there, they found Chinese bodies already there. The main thing is that the Chinese commander had fled the city without leaving any order or instruction of what to do. The Chinese soldiers took off their military uniforms and stole themselves, wearing civilian clothes, into the general populice, and yet many still tried to shoot at the Japanese; the Japanese were thrown into panick; they tried to distinguish between soldiers and civilians but did not have enough composure and time; they started doing awful things. No doubt a lot of innocent Chinese must have been murdered.

How many innocent civilians did Australian news media report were killed at that time? Life, the American pictorial magazine, reported thirty thousand and French media said twenty thousand. Even if these numbers were correct, the number of Chinese soldiers need to subracted.

There were a lot of Westeners were living or doing business in Nanjing. The Japanese did not expel them; entry and exit were free for them and Chinese; the Westerners could freely report from the city.

I do not know how many people were killed in the battles in Stalingrad of 1942~43. For the number of three hundred thousand people to die would have required a long series of warfare of a formidable intensity and concentration, which was not the case with the Nanajing battle.
To be continued.
Posted by Michi, Friday, 25 May 2018 12:08:46 PM
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