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The Forum > Article Comments > Australia Day: when should we celebrate? > Comments

Australia Day: when should we celebrate? : Comments

By Russell Grenning, published 19/1/2018

Various suggestions have been made for a new date from some significant event in the World War 11 Pacific campaign or the date (27 May) of the overwhelmingly successful 1967 referendum.

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minotaur, the fact that Sen. di Natale comes from Victoria does not make him any wiser.
Posted by Raycom, Saturday, 20 January 2018 10:56:38 AM
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I'm Sorry, but in spite of his obvious bile, opinionated has some undeniable points that need to be readdressed by those responsible!

We need to invent a time machine so we who weren't there for any of it, but nonetheless, held responsible by the very affable opinionated, so we can change the pages of history and therefore thoroughly redress opinionated's concerns. LOL

That said, I wouldn't mind if we relabeled Australia day as invasion day, replete with a reenactment of the invasion,i.e., by men bound down in iron chains staggering ashore.

Guards with bloodied cat-o-nine-tails whipping the stranglers along. Come along now this is an invasion, not a flaming sunday picnic! Get the flaming lead out. You there, with the whiskers, pick that man up, he's holding up the entire invasion!

A few heavily bearded, emaciated, old age pensioners, wouldn't look entirely out of place as the stand in (volunteer) transportees, all singing, we are you are Austrian (oztraliorn) and from all the lands on earth we come and sing with one voice? Accompanied by the rhythmic clanking of ankle chains.

With a couple of Tribal Elders watching on and providing commentary. Like, "seems we've got company, throw another couple of bags of bugs, prawns and mud crabs on the barbie, there's a fair few of them. Any paw paw left? Good, that'll do for desert along with the leftover mangoes"
Alan B.
Posted by Alan B., Saturday, 20 January 2018 11:23:43 AM
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JBowyer, you stated; 'So next time they complain let's remind them of their responsibilities that go along with their rights!' The use of the catchall term 'they' clearly infers all Aboriginal people. You made no mention of remote communities.

You also ignored my comment that mentioned the lack of infrastructure and poor housing in remote communities. Many of those communities have very poor living conditions and that is a contributing factor to a lack of hygienic conditions. To simply lay the blame on poor parenting is to ignore that plethora of factors involved. That is ignorance. If the cap fits JBowyer.
Posted by minotaur, Saturday, 20 January 2018 2:10:41 PM
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Minotaur,

I wish you could win a research scholarship to examine housing, health, education and other social aspects of life in Bangla Desh and India: you would find dire poverty (vastly worse than anything Aboriginal people here 'suffer') and yet houses and yards are clean and tidy. Children go to school with spotless clothes, after a small - same-old, same-old - breakfast, or none at all.

In societies like those, parents care for their children, as well as work like buggery for very little, to give them the best they can, since these are societies which put children first, not last.

Any FAS in Bangla Desh or India ? Probably not. A huge number of neglected kids ? Probably not. Huge numbers of kids in detention for pissy, stupid and vicious crimes ? Probably not. Some kids finishing school and going on to university ? Probably. In spite of all of the above.

Joe
Posted by Loudmouth, Saturday, 20 January 2018 2:19:52 PM
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Joe, the first recorded use of the term 'terra nullius' I can find was in 1835 when a Proclamation by Governor Bourke used the term. Here is a useful link:

http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibition/objectsthroughtime/bourketerra/index.html

As the term was used by Bourke then Justice Blackburn was not incorrect in addressing it in his judgement on milirrpum vs Nabalco Pty Ltd. Indeed he would have been remiss to have not made mention of it.

Justice Blackburn's judgement is often overlooked in the history of land rights and subsequent Native Title after Mabo (2). He may have awarded the verdict in favour of Nabalco Pty Ltd but he did recognise that Aboriginal people had laws based on connection to the land. That,in part, allowed the Mabo (2) case to eventually succeed. Blackburn was very well versed in 'Indigenous laws' of other nations and court verdicts recognising them. He made a right goose of the Commonwealth Government's solicitor in court about it too.

Cheers
Posted by minotaur, Saturday, 20 January 2018 2:24:47 PM
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Oh dear Joe, just when I was feeling benevolent toward you and provided you with some useful information, you come out with that rubbish. India and Bangladesh...really? Why choose just those two?

And I could go to both countries and find the exact opposite to what you mentioned. Children begging in the streets who don't go to school and are filthy urchins. Other children used by parents to search through rubbish dumps trying to find something to sell.

I could also go to any city/town in Australia and find dirty children not going to school and living on the streets. I could also find houses with children that are unhygienic with unkempt yards full of junk. And they aren't inhabited by Aboriginal people but your run of the mill (mostly) uneducated 'white' Australians.

Alternatively, I could also go to remote communities in Australia where many children are well cared for and going to school, getting a good education and have great ambitions/hopes for their futures. And they live in houses that are well cared for and have parents with jobs.

Nothing is absolute Joe. There is good and bad, clean and dirty, educated and uneducated, just about everywhere you go.
Posted by minotaur, Saturday, 20 January 2018 2:46:10 PM
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