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The Forum > Article Comments > Bill Leak (1956-2017) – ‘waking up with a roaring fatwa’ > Comments

Bill Leak (1956-2017) – ‘waking up with a roaring fatwa’ : Comments

By Barry York, published 21/3/2017

'These people are trying to take us down the road to fascism. It might be nice, PC, inclusive, compassionate, non-gender specific smiley-face fascism but it’s still fascism.'

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Bill Leak sure has a lot of 'friends' since he died. Don't recall any of these 'friends' coming to his aid when he was being persecuted by Gillian Triggs and her HRC gang. This one “defended his right to express his views...”. Don't remember that, either.

Isn't it marvellous how all these never-before-heard-of people come out of the woodwork to have their pennyworth after someone of note dies?

Bill Leak could have done with a lot more friends before he was hounded to death by Triggs et al, and abandoned by our so-called conservative government that is supposed to be defending freedom of speech in Australia.

As we move through this piece, we find that this 'friend' of Bill actually had nothing in common with Bill or with the “Right who supported him”. Note that it's apparently OK to refer to the “Right” who supported Bill, but not to the “Left” who didn't support him. This fellow has lot in common with Foxy, who is against labelling only when others are perceived to be doing it.

I have to say that I find it hard to believe that Bill Leak agreed that, when it came to the working class, “ there was no such thing as foreigners”.

Bill Leak should be allowed now to rest in peace, without the sycophantic clap trap that was absent during his life.
Posted by ttbn, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 8:54:32 AM
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“ ‘Being offended’ has become an argument – a case for opposition to something – rather than just a subjective feeling.”

I’ll show outrage for your subjective feelings if you show outrage for mine. This is the glue that holds the pseudo-left together. It is not about genuine offence but about the need to shore up support for the insecurities that they have about their own ability to argue their particular issue.

It is not based on real care for indigenous causes or minority sexualities or immigrants but on a kind of emotional currency. “I don’t really care about your offence but I need your support so I will act outraged for you if you do the same for me.”

This is a very fragile way to structure a society because it is not based on integrity of feeling and thought but on need. That is why so much outrage looks so confected – because it is. You cannot fake that kind of ‘care’. Political correctness is about maintaining the facade of caring and woe betide anyone who does not keep up the pretence. It is this lack of real concern which makes the psuedo-left look so pathetic. They do not have a genuine compassionate bone in their body.

People like Bill Leak expose this raw underbelly of insecurity and his detractors don’t like it at all.
Posted by phanto, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 9:09:00 AM
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Bill Leak's recent death has been marked by praise for his contributions to and defence of Australian intellectual life (the place of an ambo performing CPR springs to mind) and by his exposure of humourless, authoritarian, sanctimoniousness by a Left that has become a parody of itself (pseudo Left sounds about right). The spite coming from sections of this set in response to his death, displays in full the barrenness and reactionary nature of their politics.
They are now characterised by their need to articulate autos de fes (trials of faith) as a way of demonstrating their correctness and moral standing to those who bear uncanny similarities to the Spanish Inquisition or the snobocracy of Victorian England. It is a stance that primarily seeks approval and reassurance as opposed to engaging in debate or discussion in order to influence. This is why they seek to silence and by so doing they expose an insecurity and emptiness in their politics that Leak so effectively skewered.
How can we best honour Bill Leak? Start skewering and have fun in the process.
Posted by griffo, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 11:49:36 AM
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The so- called Left today bears no resemblance to the Left of my experience of nearly 70 years as an activist. Its reversal on freedom of speech is an aspect of the abandonment of class analysis for PC and identity politics. . In a 180 degrees turn, what once could rightly/proudly call itself the political "Left", dedicated to fighting for the rights of the exploited, has become the party of censorship, enthusiastically embracing the "hate speech" dogma of coerced conformity.
Posted by Leslie, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 11:49:56 AM
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facist best describes todays left. They are violent, push perversion and pretend to care for environment. What a joke and you have getup clowns brainwashing young kids into thinking they are helping this country.
Posted by runner, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 12:39:25 PM
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Wouldn't it be great if we could look at what unites
us rather than consistently banging on about what
divides us. What kind of an example are we setting
for our young people. I recently came across this comment
in an article on the web:

"If only we could educate our young people about the power and
joy of nature, science, technology, agriculture, et cetera
and about the benefits and obligations of modern democracy and
law".

"We need to give these young people a chance to earn and create
and belong and rejoice, not through religion but through
employment (as barristers or baristas) and literary, music, arts,
exercise, sport, and food..."

Bill Leak's cartoons are spot on. We need to discuss the
problems in our society - starting with ourselves.
Posted by Foxy, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 12:56:20 PM
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ttbn I notice Barry York had an OLO piece on free speech back in March last year. So he hasn't just crawled out of the woodwork.
Posted by David McMullen, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 6:40:59 PM
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My political leanings are much more to the right than left but there are some on the left I can respect and learn from. The late Christopher Hitchins did some fantastic work, much of Sam Harris's work is worth paying attention to even where the conclusions differ.

The seemingly blind group think, virtue signalling and apparent inability to deal with issues honestly or in any depth of so called progressives seems to have little to do with what to me seems the more honest left. No more so than the extremes of the right really represent the right.

Often from what I can see the beliefs are not actually thought through, they are tribal mantras.

On the issue of suppression of free speech the irony in the riot and violence used to shut down a Milo Yiannopoulos event at Berkeley in the US was ironic in that much of the free speech movement is regarded as having had it's roots at Berkeley. Probably worth browsing a few sources if you are interested but didn't follow it https://www.forbes.com/sites/shelbycarpenter/2017/02/02/twitter-milo-yiannopoulos-blocked-berkeley-protests/#7a14cfcf5ee8 http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/02/01/berkeley-braces-for-protests-at-yiannopoulos-talk/

My impression is that the school and media is downplaying the level of violence and trying to blame it all on the masked "outsiders". There seems to be a reasonable case to think that neither tells the true story.

R0bert
Posted by R0bert, Tuesday, 21 March 2017 9:07:48 PM
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Bill Leak drew non-consensual politico cartoons, with bias towards extreme graphics, and aimed to offend: And often did.
Isn't Australian culture alive and well, and couldn't Leaks persecution for persisting with his cartoon insults, be firmly placed under the heading " Tall poppy syndrome" as a reactionary consequence ?
Posted by diver dan, Wednesday, 22 March 2017 4:56:04 AM
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Hi Ttbn,

Your statement that " ..... I have to say that I find it hard to believe that Bill Leak agreed that, when it came to the working class, “ there was no such thing as foreigners”. ....." touches on a basic ambiguity in Australia: that, certainly since the War, the working class certainly has been built on, and by, immigrant workers. And, since they tended to get along together, it's true in a real sense that there were no foreigners, since almost everybody was a 'foreigner': everyone was becoming Australian.

From the time when I went looking for the working class in 1965 in order to participate in the imminent Revolution, I found very few Anglos, or at least Australian-born Anglos: they seemed to have mostly moved up into management. I worked at Metters, Arnott's, Kodak, Noon Pies in Preston, Balfour's, at flour mills, meat works and in produce markets, in SA, Victoria and New Zealand, and invariably 'foreigners' were in the majority: at some places, I was the only Anglo except for the supervisors and management. And we all got along pretty well. In that sense, we were all in it together, so we weren't 'foreigners' to each other.

Hence the ambiguity :) Maybe that's what Bill Leak meant ? Wouldn't have missed it for quids !

Cheers,

Joe
Posted by Loudmouth, Wednesday, 22 March 2017 11:32:31 AM
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